To celebrate National Marmalade Week why not try making your own. Don’t limit marmalade to the breakfast table, for it’s traits and qualities can be well used in other culinary ways. Marmalade makes a marvelous glaze for oven-baked ham, as well as sweet and sour chicken and pork dishes. Best of all, 3 or 4 tablespoons will make a glorious golden topping for a good old-fashioned steamed pud.

There are two basic ways of making marmalade. The sliced fruit method which provides a brighter, clearer result. The second is the whole fruit method, it is easier and less time consuming. It tends to produce a darker, less delicate preserve. Choose whichever method suits you best.

Sliced fruit method

Makes 5-6 x 450g jars

1kg Seville oranges

75ml lemon juice

2kg Fairtrade demerara sugar

 

  • Scrub the oranges, remove the buttons at the top of the fruit, then cut in half. Squeeze out the juice and keep it to one side. Using a sharp knife, slice the peel, pith and all, into thin, medium or chunky shreds, according to your preference. Put the sliced peel into a bowl with the orange juice and cover with 2.5 litres of water. Leave to soak overnight or up to 24 hours.
  • Transfer the whole mixture to a preserving pan, bring to the boil and then simmer slowly, covered until the peel is tender. This should take approximately 2 hours by which time the contents of the pan will have reduced by about one third.
  • Stir in the lemon juice and sugar. Bring the marmalade to the boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Boil rapidly until setting point is reached, about 20-25 minutes. Remove from the heat. Leave to cool for 8-10 minutes – a little longer if the peel is in very chunky pieces- then stir gently to disperse any scum, pour into warm sterilised jars and seal immediately. Use within 2 years

Whole fruit method

Makes 5x 450g jars

1kg Seville oranges

75ml lemon juice

2kg fairtrade granulated sugar

 

  • Scrub the fruit, remove the buttons at the top and put it, whole, into a preserving pan with 2.5 litres water. Bring to the boil then simmer, covered, for 2-21/2 hours or until the orange skins are tender and can be pierced easily with a fork.
  • When cool enough to handle, take the oranges out. Measure and keep the coking water- you should have about 1.7 litres. Make it up to this amount if you have less, or bring to the boil and reduce if you have more.
  • Cut the oranges in half and remove the pips with a fork, flicking them into a bowl. Strain any juice from the pips back into the cooking water, then discard the pips.
  • Meanwhile cut up the orange peel and flesh into thick, medium or thin shreds. Put the cut-up fruit into the strained cooking liquid. Add the lemon juice and sugar and bring to the boil, stirring until the sugar has completely dissolved. ┬áBring to a rolling boil and boil rapidly until setting point is reached, about 10-15 minutes.
  • Leave to cool for 10 minutes, then stir gently to disperse any scum, pour into warm sterilised jars and seal immediately. Use within 2 years.